Manna Adegbite, MB.BS
 
Dr. Adegbite is a graduate of the medical school at the University of Lagos in Nigeria. She trained in pediatrics at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Since finishing residency training in 2000, Dr. Adegbite has worked in community pediatrics and emergency medicine. She has a special interest in neonatal medicine. She is fluent English and in Yoruba.
 
Dr. Adegbite served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Botswana from October, 2007 through August, 2008.

Michelle Adler, M.D., M.P.H.
 
Dr. Adler is a graduate of Brown University, and the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. She completed a dual residency in family medicine and preventive medicine from the Oregon Health and Science University, and received her Masters of Public Health degree at Portland State University.
 
Dr. Adler has special expertise in the field of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. She spearheaded the effort that changed Oregon's law to allow for "opt-out" rather than an "opt-in" prenatal HIV testing. She also served as the co-chair of a committee that planned and implemented a rapid HIV testing program on labor and delivery at Oregon Health and Science University hospital targeted toward women who had not been tested for HIV before giving birth.
 
Dr. Adler is fluent in both English and Spanish. She accepted an assignment in the Pediatric AIDS Corps, beginning in July, 2007.

Anu Agrawal, M.D.
 
Dr. Agrawal is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, and the Baylor College of Medicine. He trained in pediatrics at the Children's Hospital and Research Center at Oakland.
 
Before starting medical school, Dr. Agrawal worked for a year at Dell Computers, where he managed forecasting of input/output devices in order to maintain an efficient supply chain. He has worked previously in Calcutta, India, and Roatan, Honduras. He is fluent in both Hindi and Spanish.
 
Dr. Agrawal accepted an assignment as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Lesotho, beginning in July, 2007. On July 1, 2008, Dr. Agrawal began a fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at the Children's Hospital and Research Center at Oakland, California.
 
Of his time serving with the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Agrawal writes the following: "Spending a year working with BIPAI in Lesotho was truly a dream fulfilled for me. There are few organizations that you will come across overseas that are as well organized and well resourced as BIPAI and this makes an incredible difference in the amount you can accomplish and your general overall well-being while working in Africa. Nothing you can expect to do as a physician in the United States can compare to the work in Africa. Every day you very palpably are saving the lives of children. It is hard to sum up the year and its effects on me in a short paragraph. Needless to say, I feel like I am a better clinician, better suited to handle many things with a stethoscope alone, better able to handle death and dying, but much more important, the patients, families and staff impart something more, something intangible to each of us as a person. They are all the epitome of resilience, determination and self-sacrifice. What I will remember most is the very elderly grandmothers who were often the ones bringing in their young grandchildren for care. Many times this would be the only family tie left. What the grandmothers understood and what I only began to understand as the year progressed, was how important our work was to them not only from a familial standpoint but also from a societal one--we were part of a team trying to save a generation and a culture. There is no limit with what you can do after working with BIPAI, either here in the States or overseas, although you may find it difficult to leave! If and when you do, you will miss the work, the patients and the people to a far greater extent than you might imagine. Only when you are back and able to retrospect can you fully appreciate what your time with BIPAI and the people of your particular African community impart on you as a person. I find even now a great desire to go back and do more."

Anouk Amzel, M.D., M.P.H.
 
Dr. Amzel is a graduate of the College of William and Mary, and the Medical College of Virginia. She trained in pediatrics at the New York Presbyterian Hospital - Cornell Campus, and also holds a masters degree in public health, with a focus on policy and management, from Columbia University.
 
Dr. Amzel currently serves as an Assistant Professor in Clinical Pediatrics at Columbia University. In this capacity, she delivers pediatric outpatient care at the Charles B. Rangel Health Center in West Harlem, New York. She has worked previously in Kenya, Guyana, and St. Lucia.
 
Dr. Amzel accepted an assignment as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Swaziland, beginning in July, 2007. She left BIPAI in October, 2008.

Jonathan Bernheimer, M.D.
 
Dr. Berheimer is a graduate of Harvard University and the Tufts University School of Medicine. He trained in pediatrics at Children's Memorial Hospital at Northwestern University. After residency, Dr. Bernheimer completed a fellowship in pediatric cardiology at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford University. He also holds a diploma in tropical medicine and hygiene from the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
 
Dr. Berheimer accepted an assignment as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Botswana, beginning in July, 2007. He left the Pediatric AIDS Corps in January, 2009 to work at the Children's Research Unit at Tygerburg Hospital and Stellenbosch University in Capetown, South Africa. He will also be pursuing a Masters in Public Health degree with a concentration in Health Services Management from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
 
Of his experience in the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Bernheimer writes:
 
"As for my experience with BIPAI, in short it was great. For a long time I had wanted to live and work in Africa, and BIPAI gave me an amazing opportunity to do that. The program was excellent for many reasons, not the least of which was the flexibility of the job and the fact that the work was multi-faceted. Between the pediatric HIV work, pediatric cardiology, outreach work, and ward work, there was never a week that was the same. I enjoyed the variety, and especially appreciated the opportunity to travel throughout the entire country while representing BIPAI.
 
How did this experience change me? Difficult to say, and I will probably answer this question better after some time has passed. One thing I can definitely say is that I feel more confident in my abilities as a doctor, and even as a person, after my experience in Botswana. From a work standpoint, the job challenged me and forced me to trust my instincts when it came to patient care. In my situation, this experience was most certainly compounded by the fact that I spent a significant amount of my time doing pediatric cardiology, a subspecialty that is woefully under-represented in Botswana. In fact, as the only practicing pediatric cardiologist in the entire country, I was forced to rely entirely on myself and my (limited) past experience. This was a real challenge, but one that enabled me to grow and (I think) become a better doctor.
 
From a personal standpoint, living in a foreign country (as we all know) presents challenges. And everything from dealing with loneliness to the myriad of cultural differences often makes life difficult. However, I shared this experience with a great group of colleagues, and there was always someone around to help me out when things became perplexing or unclear. Moreover, I made some incredible friendships in Botswana - friendships with caring and dedicated individuals who have courage and a sense of adventure - all things that I believe are needed to take a post with BIAPAI. In this way, I really think that the program is "self-selecting". So many of my colleagues possessed these characteristics. It was amazing to get to know them, and I hope to remain friends with them for a long, long time."

Christopher Buck, M.D.
 
Dr. Buck is a graduate of Wake Forest University, and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. He trained in pediatrics at the University of California in San Francisco. Dr. Buck is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha national medical honor society.
 
Dr. Buck worked previously for SmithKline Beecham healthcare services with a focus on healthcare informatics and disease management. In March, 2006, he completed a one-month rotation with BIPAI at the Children's Clinical Center of Excellence in Maseru, Lesotho, and also has worked briefly in Columbia and Peru. Dr. Buck is a fluent Spanish speaker.
 
Dr. Buck accepted an assignment as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Malawi, beginning in July, 2007. In July, 2009 he was promoted to the position of Associate Director of the Baylor College of Medicine-Abbott Fund Children's Clinical Center of Excellence-Malawi.

Seema Chandra, M.D.
 
Dr. Chandra is a graduate of Rice University and the Baylor College of Medicine. She trained in internal medicine and pediatrics at Jackson Memorial Hospital and the University of Miami, where she also served as Chief Resident.
 
Dr. Chandra is an investigator on the Life Skills Educational Project. In this capacity, she assisted in the creation and implementation of a course that assists young adults with vertically acquired HIV infection in transitioning to the adult health care system. She has been awarded a grant through the Dyson foundation to continue this project.
 
Dr. Chandra accepted an assignment as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Lesotho, beginning in July, 2007. She left BIPAI in October, 2008, to return to work at Jackson Memorial Hospital and the University of Miami.

Kevin Clarke, M.D.
 
Dr. Clarke is a graduate of the University of New Hampshire and the University of Connecticut School of Medicine. He trained in pediatrics at the University of California in San Francisco. Dr. Clarke is a member of the Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society.
 
During medical school, Dr. Clarke took a year off to work on a research training fellowship as a medical team leader at a couples HIV research clinic in Lusaka, Zambia. His responsibilities included medical staff management and treatment protocol development for tuberculosis, malaria, diarrheal illness, and HIV post-exposure prophylaxis.
 
Dr. Clarke served in the Pediatric AIDS Corps beginning in July 2007 until December 2009 where he was seconded to Zomba Central Hospital in Malawi. Along with BIPAI colleagues and in partnership with Clinton Foundation and UNICEF, Dr. Clarke helped launch the Malawi Pediatric HIV/AIDS Treatment Support & Outreach (MPHATSO) program which aims to build pediatric HIV/AIDS care capacity at district and primary healthcare levels. He left BIPAI to pursue a position as Pediatric HIV Clinical Advisor with the South-to-South Partnership for Comprehensive Family HIV Care based at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa.

Carrie Cox, M.D.
 
Dr. Cox is a graduate of Duke University and the University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine. She trained in both internal medicine and pediatrics at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, where she served as Chief Resident.
 
Dr. Cox has a long-standing interest in international health, and has worked previously in Zambia and Guatemala. She accepted an assignment as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Malawi, beginning in July, 2007.

Kara DuBray, M.D.
 
Dr. DuBray is a graduate of Stanford University and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine at Chapel Hill. She trained in pediatrics at the Children's Hospital and Research Center of Oakland. Dr. DuBray is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha national medical honor society.
 
Before starting medical school, Dr. DuBray worked for a year as an Americorps volunteer, tutoring sixth graders with learning disabilities and behavior problems in San Jose, California. She also has served as a home habilitation worker and a camp counselor for children and adults with autism. Dr. DuBray has worked previously in Guatemala (various cities) and in Santiago, Chile. She is a fluent Spanish speaker.
 
Dr. DuBray served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Lesotho from July, 2007 to July, 2008.

Michelle Eckerle, M.D.
 
Dr. Eckerle is a graduate of the University of Louisville, where she also received her medical training. She trained in pediatrics at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital medical center. Dr. Eckerle is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha national medical honor society.
 
Before joining the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Eckerle worked as a clinical staff physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital medical center. She served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Botswana from beginning in July, 2007 through December, 2008, when she returned to work at Cincinnati Children's Hospital. Dr. Eckerle also is pursuing an online MPH through Johns Hopkins University, and is actively involved in the planning and implementation of an expansion of the Cincinnati Children's Global Health program. Of her experience as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician, Dr. Eckerle writes: "As far as reflections, I can say that it was the most meaningful professional experience of my life. I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to work long term in a program that works in concert with the country governments/public health structures - it definitely gives a different perspective than one would otherwise gain from short term work. I hope that I can continue to work internationally, particularly on improving training and health care delivery systems in developing countries."

Teresa Fritts, M.D.
 
Teresa Fritts is a graduate of the University of Arizona, where she earned a BSN degree. She also attended medical school at the University of Arizona. She trained in internal medicine and pediatrics at the University of Tennessee.
 
Before attending medical school, Dr. Fritts worked for seven years as a pediatric nurse at the University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona. She accepted an assignment as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Lesotho, beginning in July, 2007.

Satish Gopal, M.D., M.P.H.
 
Dr. Gopal is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Duke University School of Medicine. He trained in both pediatrics and internal medicine at the University of Michigan, where he also served as Chief Resident in 2004 and 2005. Dr. Gopal has Masters of Public Health degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
 
Before joining the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Gopal served as a hospitalist and clinician educator at Norwalk Hospital in Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Moshi, Tanzania, from July, 2007 through June, 2009.

George Han, M.D.
 
George Han is a graduate of Harvard University and the Baylor College of Medicine, where he also completed training in pediatrics. He has worked previously in Botswana, Honduras, and Guatemala. Dr. Han is fluent in English, Spanish, and Taiwanese.
 
Dr. Han served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Botswana from July, 2007 through July, 2008. After leaving the PAC, Dr. Han accepted a position with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer, Global Immunization Division. After two years as an EIS Officer assigned to the Pennsylvania Department of Health, Dr. Han began the MPH program at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in June 2010. After completion of the MPH, he plans to begin a preventive medicine residency with CDC in June 2011. Reflecting on his time with BIPAI, Dr. Han reflects: "Working with BIPAI for an extended period of time in Africa allows you to see the realities of HIV/AIDS care on the ground, which can be discouraging once the magnitude of the problem sets in. Because ARV treatment is lifelong, you quickly understand the importance of sustainability; that alone distinguishes BIPAI from much international aid work. How can we make what we are doing sustainable? One of the joys of the job is teaching children and adolescents about their condition and explaining the ways they can contribute to ensuring their own health. The knowledge that those few minutes spent in a clinic visit might positively impact a child's life for years to come was incredibly fulfilling and gave me hope for the future--and sustainability--of HIV/AIDS care in Africa."

Fiona Henderson, M.D., F.A.A.P.
 
Dr. Henderson is a graduate of UCLA and the US Davis School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at the Children's Hospital and Research Center in Oakland, California. Since completing residency in 2003, Dr. Henderson has worked as an inpatient pediatric attending and as a pediatric hospitalist.
 
Dr. Henderson has worked previously in rural Costa Rica, and has traveled extensively in Southeast and Central Asia. She accepted an assignment with as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Swaziland, beginning in July, 2007.

Michelle Kiang, M.D.
 
Dr. Kiang is a graduate of Harvard University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She trained in pediatrics at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC. Dr. Kiang currently serves as a pediatric hospitalist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) Connection at Shore Memorial Hospital in Somers Point, New Jersey. Dr. Kiang is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha national medical honor society. Dr. Kiang has volunteered previously as a pediatrician at Ekwendeni Mission Hospital in Ekwendeni, Malawi. She worked as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Botswana from July, 2007 through December, 2008. Dr Kiang now lives in Santa Clara, California. She is working as a general pediatrician for Santa Clara Valley Medical Center doing both primary care and urgent care.

Parth Mehta, M.D.
 
Dr. Mehta is a graduate of Simon's Rock College, and the State University of New York at Stony Brook medical school, where he also trained in pediatrics. After residency, Dr. Mehta completed a fellowship in pediatric hematology/oncology at the Baylor College of Medicine.
 
He accepted an assignment as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Botswana, beginning in July, 2007.

Paul Mullan, M.D.
 
Dr. Mullan is a graduate of Columbia University and the Weill-Cornell Medical College of Cornell University. He trained in pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. During medical school, Dr. Mullan completed a three-month summer rotation at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center in Moshi, Tanzania. He is the Founder and President of Camp Phoenix, which is a free children's camp for pediatric burn survivors and their families.
 
Dr. Mullan served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Botswana from July, 2007 through June, 2009, when he left the Pediatric AIDS Corps to pursue a combined pediatric emergency medicine and global health fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine with Texas Children's Hospital. Of his service as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor, Dr. Mullan writes: "My two years working in Botswana were an incredibly enriching experience. Prior to BIPAI, I had a number of shorter international experiences that were meaningful but whose impact was limited by their vertical outlook on addressing a single issue, often using a system that acted in parellel to the local public system that was already in place. As opposed to these medical missions, the longer term commitment of BIPAI promotes more complete acceptance into the local society and more colllaboration with permanent healthcare professionals. This collaboration encourages participation in projects which are more sustainable and feasible than would otherwise occur in short medical missions. Ideally, these BIPAI projects worked in conjunction with the local ministry of health with the ultimate goal of building the capacity of the local health system. Resource-limited settings, such as those in which BIPAI operates, provide a exciting opportunity for a young physician to be active in a senior position in many different areas that would otherwise take decades to realize in a resource-rich setting. If every physician in America spent at least one year working in a resource-limited setting, our profession would probably have less financial waste, less polypharmacy, more compassion, and an improved American image abroad. I highly recommend the Pediatrics AIDS Corp, or other similar organizations, to any new physician who is considering international work.

Alina Olteanu, M.D.
 
Dr. Olteanu is a graduate of the University of Medicine and Pharmacy in Cluj, Romania. She trained in pediatrics at the Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Olteanu also hold a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is fluent in English, German, and Romanian.
 
Dr. Olteanu served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Lesotho, from July, 2007 through June, 2008. She now serves as an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Section of General Academic Pediatrics at Tulane School of Medicine in New Orleans, where she works on a Mobile Medical Unit (MMU) funded by the Children's Health Fund. Of her year in the PAC, Dr. Olteanu writes: "Working for BIPAI in Lesotho was an excellent hands-on experience in international pediatrics, in a very well-organized setting. Being a PAC physician is a great starting point for anyone interested in a career in international health. I enjoyed having a very diverse experience, from clinical work to being involved in public health projects. I can not imagine a better first job!"

Jeffrey Pierce, M.D.
 
Dr. Pierce is a graduate o the University of Texas - Pan American, and the Baylor College of Medicine. He trained in family practice medicine at the Santa Rosa Family Practice residency program. Dr. Pierce holds a Certificate of Knowledge from the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
 
Dr. Pierce has worked previously in Guatemala, Peru, Honduras, and Mexico. He is a fluent Spanish speaker.
 
Dr. Pierce served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Lesotho, from July, 2007 through September, 2008. He currently is working in a variety of positions that allow him to practice between the US and the developing world (teaching residents at the UCSF/Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency, locum tenens at La Clinica Alianza, International work via Baylor Shoulder To Shoulder and other groups). Of his time with the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Pierce writes:
 
"Working in Lesotho as a PAC doctor was phenomenal, and I'm grateful for having had the opportunity. The work was often challenging but always rewarding. I am better skilled to work internationally, and after seeing what is possible in such settings, am energized to keep that commitment strong. I am thankful for the chance to have worked alongside amazing, impassioned doctors, and to be a part of the lives of our patients - people often sick, tired, and neglected, but quick to offer a genuine smile and a warm greeting. I strongly recommend working as part of the PAC to those who want to improve themselves as physicians, help truly disadvantaged populations, and have an active role in curbing the premier epidemic of our time."

Richard Pittman, M.D.
 
Dr. Pittman is a graduate of the University of Mississippi and pursued his medical training at the University of Mississippi medical center. He trained in internal medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern in Dallas, where he currently serves a Chief Resident.
 
Before starting medical school, Dr. Pittman taught eighth grade biology, ninth and tenth grade chemistry, and eleventh grade English. He has worked previously in Patagonia, Chile.
 
Dr. Pittman accepted an assignment as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Swaziland, beginning in July, 2007. He left the PAC in December, 2008, to accept a position as Assistant Professor at Emory University in Atlanta, Goergia. He works at the Grady Health System, and has a special focus in palliative care.

Guadalupe Richter, M.D.
 
Dr. Richter is a graduate of Louisiana State University (Baton Rouge), and the Louisiana State University (New Orleans) School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at the University of Tennessee, Memphis.
 
Dr. Richter has lived previously in Australia, Papua New Guinea, Germany, and the United States. She has worked previously in both the Philippines and El Salvador.
 
Dr. Richter served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Lesotho from July, 2007 through October, 2008, when she transferred to assist in the scale-up of the new BIPAI facility in Mwanza, Tanzania. She left the Pediatric AIDS Corps in March, 2009.

Janell Routh, M.D., M.H.S.
 
Dr. Routh is a graduate of the University of Colorado in Boulder, and the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at UCSF, and also holds a Master of Health Science degree from the University of California Berkeley. Dr. Routh is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha national medical honor society.
 
Before starting medical school, Dr. Routh served for two years as a teacher and health educator in Malawi. She also worked for eighteen months as a volunteer at the Chiedza Home of Hope in Harare, Zimbabwe, and later returned to Zimbabwe for seven months to serve as Project Director for a mobile voluntary HIV testing and counseling project.
 
Dr. Routh served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Malawi from August, 2007 through May, 2010 when she left the PAC to serve as an Epidemic Intelligence Officer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Dr. Routh serves in their food/waterborne division investigating outbreaks internationally and domestically. Of her time in the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Routh writes:
 
"I never grow tired of talking to people about our amazing organization (BIPAI) and the work we do. It is wonderful to see from a different perspective how truly unique BIPAI is. A commitment to clinical work in these countries without the research strings attached is a rare and wonderful gift to be able to give to us, and speaking with people who were amazed by this reminded me not to take it for granted. I have enjoyed every single minute of this experience, and even the frustrating moments will seem nostalgic when I look back over the past three years. In particular, I want to say thank you to Dr. Kazembe, for giving me the flexibility in Malawi to work, not just with BIPAI but with Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital. I have had a unique experience among my BIPAI colleagues in being able to work for this institution. The opportunities to see bread and butter tropical medicine and work with world-renowned physicians have shaped my understanding of being a clinician and given me insight about my future career. I feel like I have been able to contribute to pediatric ART care in Malawi at a different, yet complimentary level to the BIPAI clinic in Lilongwe and the opportunities to teach medical students at the College of Medicine will leave a lasting impression of our impact on the country."

Sebastian Strigl, M.D.
 
Dr. Strigl received his MD from Humboldt University in Berlin. He trained in pediatrics at the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, where is also served as Chief Resident. After residency, Dr. Strigl completed a fellowship in pediatric cardiology at the Children's Hospital of New York at Columbia University, and a fourth year of fellowship in cardiac imaging at Children's Hospital in Boston.
 
Dr. Strigl served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Malawi from September through December, 2007. After the PAC, he accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine Yeshiva University, in New York, and as an Attending Physician in the Division of Pediatric Cardiology at Children's Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, NY, and Director, Division of Pediatric Cardiology at Jacobi Medical Center.

Omolara Thomas, M.D.
 
Dr. Thomas is a graduate of the City University of New York and the New York University School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at the Boston Combined Residency Program.
 
Dr. Thomas has worked previously in Kisumu, Kenya, and in Mapoteng, Lesotho. She has traveled regularly to Nigeria with her family. Dr. Thomas accepted an assignment as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Malawi, beginning in July, 2007. In August, 2008, Dr. Thomas returned to the United States, where she accepted a position as a primary care clinical research fellow in urban community health, and as an assistant attending physician in clinical pediatrics at the Columbia University Medical Center in New York.
 
Dr. Thomas writes of her PAC experience:
 
"Working with BIPAI in Malawi allowed me to learn about the joys and challenges of working overseas on a long-term basis. During my time, after working primarily in the outreach setting to improve HIV/AIDS care for Malawian children living in rural areas, I decided that I wanted to focus my career on public health to learn more about working to improve existing systems to improve pediatric healthcare. I am currently at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health pursuing my Masters' in Public Health Degree in the Population and Family Health under the Global Health Track, as well as completing a fellowship to improve my research skills. As part of the degree, I will have the opportunity to return to Africa for 6 months to work on a research project. Upon completion, I hope to base my career in Nigeria, where my parents are originally from, to improve access to healthcare for children in that region."