Eileen Birmingham, M.D.

Dr. Birmingham is a graduate of Amherst College and the Brown University School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco, where she served as Chief Resident.

Dr. Birmingham was the recipient of the Rudolph Award from the University of California at San Francisco in 2004 for the resident "who has been most supportive of, and empathetic towards, nurses, faculty and fellow residents." She has worked in Cambodia and Honduras, and is a Spanish speaker.

Dr. Birmingham served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from July, 2006 through April, 2008. She is currently working towards a Master’s Degree in Public Health from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, with a focus on preventive medicine. During her service with the PAC, Dr. Birmingham became very interested in learning to work with data to monitor and evaluate programs. She will pursue this interest after completion of her public health training.


Annie Buchanan, M.D., M.P.H.

A native of North Carolina, Dr. Buchanan is a graduate of North Carolina State University and the East Carolina University School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at the University of Rochester, where she served as Chief Resident. Dr. Buchanan holds a degree in public health from the University of North Carolina and a diploma in tropical medicine from the Gorgas Hospital in Lima, Peru.

Dr. Buchanan was the recipient of the Meg Colgan Award at Rochester University in 2004-2005 for "outstanding dedication to her patient population, with sensitivity to the special needs of vulnerable children and their families." She spent two years on assignment for the U.S. Peace Corps in Thailand. She also has worked in Bolivia, Nicaragua and Tibet. She speaks Spanish and Thai. Regarding her career goals, Dr. Buchanan says, "I imagine myself working in a community or migrant health center with indigent populations, where I would still have exposure to infectious diseases and tropical medicine and get to work with the patient population I love. In short, the Pediatric AIDS Corps is exactly what I have been looking for, in what I hope will be a lifelong career incorporating HIV and tropical medicine with primary care, both at home and abroad."

Dr. Buchanan served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Malawi from August, 2006 through June, 2007, and as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Tanzania from June, 2007 through June 2008. After Pediatric AIDS Corps service, Dr. Buchanan moved to North Carolina to pursue a fellowship in infectious diseases from Duke University. She plans to return to Moshi, Tanzania in July, 2009 for eighteen months to pursue fellowship research looking at rates of mycobacteremia in febrile HIV+ children.


Ellie Click, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Click is a graduate of Wellesley College and the Stanford University School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Click holds a Ph.D. in genetics from Stanford University.

Dr. Click was the recipient of the Ann E. Dyson Award for Child Advocacy from the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2004. She has worked in El Salvador, Thailand, New Guinea and India. She speaks German and Spanish.

Dr. Click served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Malawi from July, 2006 through December, 2008. After leaving the PAC, Dr. Click accepted a position with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer.


Anjalee Dave, M.D.

Dr. Dave is a graduate of Boston University and SUNY Downstate College of Medicine. She trained in Pediatrics at Columbia University and the Children's Hospital of New York. She also holds a Master of Science degree from the Medical College of Philadelphia/Hahnemann University.

Dr. Dave has a lengthy history of volunteer and extracurricular activities, which includes working at a homeless women's shelter, working in an alcohol and substance abuse treatment program, and serving as a teaching assistant for a medical ethics course at Hahnemann University.

Dr. Dave served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Malawi from July, 2006 through December, 2007. She currently serves as an Instructor of Clinical Pediatrics for Columbia University. She works as a hospitalist in the pediatric intensive care unit.


Sachin Desai, M.D.

A native of Rochester, New York, Dr. Desai is a graduate of Bowling Green State University, and the Medical College of Ohio. He trained in Pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Michigan.

Dr. Desai served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from January, 2006 through March, 2007, when he left to pursue a fellowship in infectious diseases from Yale University. We greatly appreciate Dr. Desai's service as a founding member of the Pediatric AIDS Corps, and wish him all the best with fellowship and beyond.


Daniel Dewey, M.D.

Dr. Dewey is a graduate of Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minnesota, and the University of Minnesota School of Medicine. He trained in Family Practice at the Santa Rosa Family Practice residency program.

Dr. Dewey is a former Peace Corps volunteer. He worked as a high school science teacher in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, West Indies, from 1994-1996. He has traveled widely throughout Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean, and is fluent in Spanish.

Dr. Dewey served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from August, 2006 through December, 2007. He then left the PAC to pursue an emergency medicine fellowship at the University of Tennessee in Jackson, TN. He writes of his PAC experience: "Participating in the PAC has greatly broadened my perspective on the state of international medicine, medical philanthropy, world poverty, pharmaceutical access, health care access, public health and economic inequalities in Africa. It has inspired me to continue working to right some of these imbalances throughout my career. I plan to continue working in international medicine and HIV care in some capacity throughout my career".


Clarissa M. Dudley, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Dudley is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She trained in Pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Alabama at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She also holds a Master's Degree in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University (International Health track).

Dr. Dudley has worked previously in Vietnam, the Philippines, and in Kenya, and as the Clinical Director of Outpatient Pediatrics at the Virginia Hospital Center/Georgetown University.

Dr. Dudley served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Lesotho from August, 2006 through June, 2007. She currently serves as a pediatrician at a community based health center affiliated with Children's National Medical Center in Washington DC.


Dana Duncan, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Duncan is a graduate of Stanford University and the University of California, San Francisco. She trained in pediatrics at Stanford University, and has a Masters Degree in Public Health, with a focus in epidemiology, from the University of California at Berkeley.

Dr. Duncan's high school diploma is from the Lycee International de Los Angeles, where all coursework was taught in French from 6th through 12th grade. She has previously worked for eight months as a Field Researcher in Cameroon. Her most recent position was as an attending pediatrician at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, department of pediatrics.

Dr. Duncan served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Burkina Faso from July, 2006 through December, 2007, before transferring to Swaziland, where she served through July, 2008.


Nader Kim El-Mallawany, M.D.

A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Dr. El-Mallawany is a graduate of Princeton University and the Medical College of Ohio. He trained in pediatrics at Brown University.

In 2005, Dr. El-Mallawany served as a guest lecturer at a summer program in Jerusalem, which seeks to unite Israeli and Palestinian youth with common interests in the medical profession. He has also worked previously in Egypt, Honduras, and Peru. He speaks Spanish, Egyptian Arabic, and Korean.

Dr. El-Mallawany served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Malawi from August, 2006 through July, 2007. He left the PAC to purse a fellowship in pediatric hematology/oncology and bone marrow transplant at Columbia University/Babies and Children's Hospital of New York. Of his experience in the PAC, Dr. El-Mallawany writes the following: "My experience with BIPAI has and will forever shape my career trajectory and goals. As a fellow in hematology/oncology, I hope to finish my training and then return to BIPAI as an HIV clinician with a focus on HIV associated malignancies. The clinical experience I gained in Malawi was forever enriching to my current clinical practices, not only because of the commonality shared in the immunesuppressed patients but in a more general appreciation for the great diversity of patients and pathologies encountered during my experience with BIPAI."


Chelsea Forbes, M.D.

Dr. Forbes is a graduate of the University of California Los Angeles, where she studied as an undergraduate, a medical student, and where she completed her residency in pediatrics. Dr. Forbes has worked previously in Mexico, Nicaragua, Ecuador, and Honduras.

Dr. Forbes served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Botswana from July, 2006 through December, 2008. She now works as a pediatrician in an outpatient clinic in Carlsbad, a northern coastal city in San Diego. Of her experience in the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Forbes writes: "My experience with BIPAI was phenomenal, and I think about the kids in Botswana a lot during my clinic days here. I returned to the States to live closer to my family, and for now, I plan to stay working in San Diego. I still feel a drive toward international medicine though, and I do know I will be working internationally again in the future, though I am not sure yet in what capacity that will be."


Anthony Garcia-Prats, M.D.

A native of Houston, Dr. Garcia-Prats is a graduate of St. Louis University and the Baylor College of Medicine. He trained in pediatrics at the Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, where he served as chief resident

Dr. Garcia-Prats was the recipient of McNamara Award presented by the Pele Chandler Endowment for contributions to child health and safety in 2004, and the Drs. Ralph and Judith Feigin Outstanding Resident Award at the Baylor College of Medicine in 2004-2005.

Dr. Garcia-Prats served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Lesotho from August, 2006 through February, 2009. He currently is leading scale-up of the new BIPAI facility in Mbeya, Tanzania.


Suzanne Gaudreault, M.D., M.S.

Dr. Gaudreault is a graduate of Loyola University in New Orleans and the Louisiana State University School of Medicine with a masters degree from Oregon State University. She completed residency in family medicine (international health track) at the University of Cincinnati.

Dr. Gaudreault served for three years as a Peace Corps volunteer in Mali, West Africa. She has also worked as a physician in Mali and Honduras. She is fluent in French and Spanish, and also speaks Dioula, one of the predominant languages spoken in Bobo-Dioulasso. Prior to joining PAC, she was on the family medicine department faculty at Emory University in Atlanta, working in an immigrant health clinic.

Dr. Gaudreault served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Burkina Faso from July, 2006 through August, 2009. She currently works as a Senior Advisor for HIV/AIDS for USAID's Health Care Quality Improvement program with the Center for Human Services in Washington DC.


Annu Goel, M.D.

Dr. Goel is a graduate of Lehigh University and Drexel University medical school (formerly known as The Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hahneman University). She trained in pediatrics at Jefferson University/DuPont Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Dr. Goel has worked for the past four years as a pediatrician at the Fort Defiance Hospital for the Indian Health Services on a Navajo reservation in Arizona. She also spent a year (June 2001 July, 2002) as Director of Pediatrics at the Chiri Health Center in Ethiopia. Together with one internist, the team was the sole providers for a population of approximately 100,000 in rural southwest Ethiopia.

Dr. Goel served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Lesotho from August, 2006 through April, 2008.


Carrie Golitko, M.D.

A native of Indialantic, Florida, Dr. Golitko is a graduate of the University of Florida at Gainesville and the Creighton University School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at Brown University.

Dr. Golitko developed a passion for international health while on rotation at the Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Cambodia. She has volunteered previously with Habitat for Humanity, Kid's Explore Youth Mentor Program, and Adolescent Substance Abuse Prevention Program.

Dr. Golitko served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from July, 2006 until March, 2008, and she currently works as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Malawi.


Matt Gralewski, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Gralewski is a graduate of Pennsylvania State University and the Medical College of Pennsylvania. He trained in internal medicine at Drexel University (formerly known as The Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hahneman University). He is currently completing his MPH degree at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst.

Dr. Gralewski has worked for the past four years as an internist at the Fort Defiance Hospital for the Indian Health Services on a Navajo reservation in Arizona. He also spent a year (June 2001 July, 2002) as the Medical Director at the Chiri Health Center in Ethiopia. Together with one pedaitrician, the team was the sole providers for a population of approximately 100,000 in rural southwest Ethiopia.

Dr. Gralewski served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Lesotho from August, 2006 through April, 2008. After his PAC service, he accepted a position with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Hanoi, Vietnam as the Chief of the PEPFAR Care and Treatment technical working group.


Laura Guderian, M.D.

A native of Louisiana, Dr. Guderian earned undergraduate and medical degrees from the Louisiana State University. She trained in internal medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City.

Dr. Guderian says, "My initial encounter with the devastating effects of HIV was as an undergraduate volunteer for Community Hospice of Louisiana. During my three years providing respite care for hospice patients, I witnessed overwhelming tragedy and loss endured by individuals and families as a result of AIDS. I saw in them incredible strength and courage in the face of suffering and death. The experience inspired me to devote my career to improving the lives of those living with HIV and AIDS."

Dr. Guderian served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Botswana from August, 2006 through July, 2007. After leaving the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Guderian accepted a position as an Infectious Diseases Fellow (Internal Medicine) and Preventive Medicine Resident at UNC-Chapel Hill Department of Medicine. In 2008, Dr. Guderian wrote: "I am in the process of completing my fellowship in infectious diseases in addition to a residency in preventive medicine. I am also studying for an MPH in epidemiology. My current research includes monitoring response to antiretroviral therapy in resource-constrained settings and management of antiretroviral therapy following completion of TB treatment. My goal is to care for patients in an antiretroviral clinic, conduct clinical research, and assist in training and education of local health workers. My experience as a PAC doctor gave me a better understanding of the challenges faced when working in a new culture and a new environment." In 2010, Dr. Guderian accepted the position of Director of HIV Care at a federally qualified community health center in the south Bronx, New York. Her responsibilities include educating primary care/social medicine residents about HIV care, quality improvement measures for HIV patients receiving care at the clinic, as well as serving as the ID consult and general medicine ward attending periodically."


Eric Gustafson, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Gustafson is a graduate of Georgetown University and the Tulane University School of Medicine. He trained in pediatrics and internal medicine at Tulane, where he served as chief resident. Dr. Gustafson holds a degree in public health and tropical medicine from Tulane University.

Dr. Gustafson worked as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Botswana from January, 2006 through August, 2006, and then as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor in Tanzania through March, 2007. After leaving the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Gustafson accepted a position as a hospitalist with Sutter Solano Medical Center in Vallejo, CA.


Megan C. Harkless, M.D.

Dr. Harkless is a graduate of the University of North Carolina and the University of Colorado School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at the University of Vermont.

Dr. Harkless says, "The Pediatric AIDS Corps offers the opportunity to be on the front lines in stopping the current devastation of HIV. This has the potential to change lives and, as a result, countries and the world through facilitating and cooperating in education, prevention and treatment. That is exciting to me. I want to be a part of bringing back hope to children and their communities."

Dr. Harkless served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps doctor from August, 2006 to December, 2007 in Botswana, and from January, 2008 through July, 2009 in Lesotho.


Adrian Hazbun, M.D.

Dr. Hazbun is a graduate of Yale University and the Temple University School of Medicine. He trained in family medicine at the Ventura County (California) Medical Center. Dr. Hazbun worked for three years as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in Tanzania, where he taught chemistry to Tanzanian youth. He speaks Swahili, French, Spanish and Arabic.

Dr. Hazbun served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Botswana, Uganda, and Tanzania from October, 2005 through November, 2007.


Heather Hindo, M.D.

Dr. Hindo is a graduate of the University of San Francisco and the Collegium Medicum at Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. She trained in pediatrics at the Children's Hospital in Akron, Ohio, and finished Fellowship training in pediatric infectious diseases at the Eastern Virginia Medical School/Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters in Norfolk, Virginia. Dr. Hindo's research during Fellowship focused on Staphylococcus aureus infection.

Dr. Hindo served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Botswana from July, 2006 through December, 2007. Dr. Hindo currently works as an attending pediatrician at Cottage Children's Hospital in Santa Barbara, CA.


Mandeep S. Jassal, M.D., M.P.H.

A native of northern New York, Dr. Jassal is a graduate of Stony Brook University and the Stony Brook University School of Medicine. He has an MPH degree from Harvard University. Dr. Jassal completed his residency in pediatrics at New York University.

Dr. Jassal has worked previously in an HIV/AIDS clinic in the South Bronx, on a protocol to asses adherence to antiretroviral therapy. He is co-founder and co-president of the Stony Brook University chapter of Physicians for Human Rights.

Dr. Jassal served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Botswana from August, 2006 through July, 2007. After leaving the PAC, Dr. Jassal began a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Pediatric Pulmonology at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Jassal writes of his PAC service: "My key area of research is in the field of tuberculosis. I am investigating TB lung cavitation - the key means of disease transmission to children. My underlying desire and almost all of my insight into this field stems from my PAC experience in Botswana. The vast amounts of cases of TB I had seen in the inpatient and outpatient setting has provided me with an incredibly valuable approach to research and clinical care. In all honesty, I think I am a far better doctor now given the experience that PAC offered. Thanks!"


Leah Kern, M.D.

Dr. Kern is a graduate of Yale University and the Harvard Medical School. She completed residency in pediatrics at the Children's National Medical Center in Washington DC.

Dr. Kern served for two years as a Peace Corps volunteer in Guinea, West Africa. She also has worked previously is The Gambia, Guatemala, and Thailand. She is fluent in both Spanish and French.

Dr. Kern served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Burkina Faso from July, 2006 through June, 2008. She left the Pediatric AIDS Corps to pursue a Masters Degree in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Kern writes of her PAC experience: "The experience with BIPAI in Burkina Faso confirmed my desire to work in global child health both clinically and in public health. Clinical practice in Burkina made me realize the importance of the link between nutrition and child survival in west Africa, and I hope to continue work in this particular area. I plan to obtain an MPH and then to work in academic clinical pediatrics working on global child health issues."


Sarah Kidd, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Kidd is a graduate of Amherst College and the University of Washington School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics in the Boston Combined Residency Program. Dr. Kidd also holds a Master of Public Health degree in health policy and management from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Dr. Kidd previously served as the Assistant Medical Director of the University Health System Consortium in Oak Brook, Illinois. In this role, she provided assistance to academic medical centers to improve clinical processes and systems for delivery of patient-centered care that is safe, effective, efficient, timely, and equitable. She also assisted with the management of a national database of inpatient clinical and administrative patient data, analyzed comparative data, and surveyed the literature and member hospitals to identify best practices in patient care and management systems.

Dr. Kidd served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Malawi from July, 2006 through June, 2007, and then in Swaziland until June, 2008. After leaving the PAC, Dr. Kidd accepted a position with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, Global Immunization Division.


Julia Kim, M.D.

A native of Columbus, Ohio, Dr. Kim is a graduate of Amherst College and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. She completed residency in pediatrics at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, where she also served as fourth year Chief Resident. She previously served as an attending physician within the Division of Emergency Medicine at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Dr. Kim has worked internationally in Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, and South Korea. She speaks both Spanish and Korean. Dr. Kim served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from July, 2006 through April 2008.


Maria Kim, M.D.

Dr. Kim is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at Columbia Presbyterian Children's Hospital of New York. She is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha national medical honor society.

During medical school and training Dr. Kim worked in Inner Mongolia, Honduras, and Botswana, and speaks both Korean and Spanish.

Dr. Kim started as a member of the Pediatric AIDS Corps in 2006 and worked in Malawi from 2006 until March 2010. During this time, Dr. Kim became very interested in the relationship between HIV infection and malnutrition, and helped to start an outpatient nutritional rehabilitation program for HIV infected children. In addition, along with Dr. Saeed Ahmed, she started a community outreach program called Tingathe (meaning "Yes we can" in the local Chichewa), which uses community health workers to improve EID, PMTCT, and Pediatric HIV Care and Treatment Outcomes. Dr. Kim has now joined the Retrovirology department at Texas Children's Hospital, and will be assisting with the new Global Health Residency. However, she will continue to be involved with Malawi and the Tingathe program.


Sarah S. Kim, M.D.

A native of Dallas, Dr. Kim is a graduate of Austin College and the Baylor College of Medicine. She was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha, the national medical honor society, in 2002. She was named the top student in pediatrics at the Baylor College of Medicine in 2003. She trained in pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Boston, Boston Medical Center, and Harvard University.

Dr. Kim has worked in Mexico, India and Zambia. Dr. Kim served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician inLesotho from August, 2006 through July, 2007. She worked as a pediatric hospitalist at the Medical City Children's Hospital in Dallas, Texas from August, 2007 through July, 2008. She currently is pursuing a Masters of Public Health degree from Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Of her experience in the PAC, Dr. Kim writes: "The year I spent in Lesotho with the first class of the PAC 2006-2007 was a life-changing, amazing experience. Having participated in several short-term international health electives, I already knew I enjoyed working in developing countries, but this experience taught me the incredible value of establishing long-term relationships with national colleagues and our patients. Here we were able to directly witness children come back from extreme illness to running around the waiting room of the COE and caregivers who were so impacted by their children's recovery that they became active treatment supporters in their communities. I feel very lucky to have been part of such a cadre of energetic committed PAC docs who aimed to improve child health on so many different levels. During my year there, I was particularly moved by the dual burden of HIV and malnutrition and wanted to study interventions targeting malnutrition and food insecurity which brought me to public health school. I hope to use what I learn to help developing countries work toward effective and sustainable interventions for improving child health and nutrition."


JoAnna Leyenaar, M.D., M.P.H., F.R.C.P.C.

A native of Ontario, Canada, Dr. Leyenaar is a graduate of the University of Guelph and the McMaster University Medical School. She trained in pediatrics at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Dr. Leyenaar holds a public health degree from Harvard University.

Dr. Leyenaar has worked in Uganda, Kenya and Romania. She served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Lesotho from September, 2005 through May, 2007. After leaving the Pediatric AIDS Corps. Dr. Leyennar accepted a position as the Director of Monitoring and Evaluation for the Consortium for Strategic HIV Operations Research with the Clinton Foundation HIV/AIDS Initiative.


Helga Loeffler, M.D.

Dr. Loeffler is a graduate of the Albert Ludwig University and College of Medicine in Freiburg, Germany. She completed her pediatric training at the Children's University Hospital in Freiburg. She also studied medicine for one year at the University Rene Descartes, Faculte Necker Enfants Malades in Paris, financed by a scholarship of the German Academic Exchanges Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst). Dr. Loeffler has experience providing care and treatment for HIV-infected children at the outpatient clinic at the University Childrens' Hospital in Freiburg.

Dr. Loeffler served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from August, 2006 through June, 2007. After leaving the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Loeffler accepted a position as a senior intern in the Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and the Department of General Pediatrics at the University Childrens Hospital in Freiburg, Germany.


Amy E. McCollum, M.D.

Dr. Amy McCollum is a graduate of Rhodes College and the University of Mississippi School of Medicine. Dr. McCollum trained in pediatrics at the Children's Medical Center in Dallas, part of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, where she served as chief resident. She did some of her undergraduate coursework in Zimbabwe, and has traveled to Ethiopia to assist with an HIV program under development in Addis Ababa.

Dr. McCollum served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from August, 2006 through June, 2010. After leaving Swaziland, Dr. McCollum enrolled in the MPH program in Epidemiology at the University of Alabama.


David L. McCollum, M.D.

Dr. McCollum went to college at Rhodes College in Memphis and then to medical school at the University of Missisippi. He did his residency in internal medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern. He spent four years as PAC physician in Swaziland. After leaving the PAC in June, 2010, Dr. McCollum began an infectious disease fellowship at the University of Alabama Birmingham. He is married to PAC doctor Amy McCollum. They have three children.

Dr. McCollum describes his experience in the PAC as follows: "I spent four years working in Swaziland as a pediatric AIDS Corps Doctor. The experience was more intense, more rewarding, more frustrating, more joyous, more tragic...in general more real, than any experience I have previously had. It has given clarity to my career...which is to continue doing similar work. After the PAC, I am starting an infectious disease fellowship at UAB, with the intent of moving back to Southern Africa in the near future."


Eric D. McCollum, M.D.

Dr. McCollum earned his doctorate in medicine from Medical College of Virginia in 2003 where he received the Alpha Omega Alpha distinction. Subsequently, he completed residency training in pediatrics at the Columbia University Medical Center in 2006. During residency Dr. McCollum developed a community youth program named STREET BALL that introduced anatomy and physiology principles to youth through basketball. After residency training, Dr. McCollum moved to Malawi in July 2006 as a founding member of the Pediatric AIDS Corps and worked for the Baylor International Pediatric AIDS Initiative until May 2010.

In Malawi, Dr. McCollum cared for HIV-infected and HIV-exposed hospitalized children in a referral hospital in Lilongwe, gaining clinical experience in a setting with complex patient pathology but limited diagnostic and treatment options. Furthermore, Dr. McCollum implemented and supervised a routine inpatient pediatric HIV testing program that tested more than 30,000 mothers and children for HIV and enrolled more than 1,000 children into HIV care at the Malawi Center of Excellence in two years. This program is currently being implemented throughout Malawi at other government hospitals, and Dr. McCollum has produced one first-author publication from this work. Additionally, he supported the Malawian Ministry of Health in the development and expansion of a national early infant HIV diagnosis program and contributed to the 2008 national Malawi antiretroviral therapy guidelines.

After the PAC, Dr. McCollum will remain in Malawi as a Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellow to conduct clinical research on p24 antigen point-of-care infant HIV diagnostics. Upon completion of his clinical research fellowship, Dr. McCollum will begin a pediatric fellowship in pediatric intensive care and anesthesia at Children's Hospital Boston in 2011, during which he intends to further his clinical and research interests in global child health.

"Undoubtedly, my experiences in Malawi with Baylor have forever changed my life. I experienced first-hand the challenges of providing healthcare in a severely resource-constrained setting, and I know that I will look back upon my time with Baylor as some of my most exciting and life-shaping years both professionally and personally. I am extremely grateful to BIPAI for having had this opportunity."


Monica McGrann, M.D., M.Sc.

Originally from Bryan, Texas, Dr. McGrann is a graduate of Texas A&M University, and the Texas A&M School of Medicine. She holds a Master of Science degree in health policy, which she obtained from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the London School of Economics. Her Masters degree was supported by a Fulbright scholarship. She trained in pediatrics at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Dr. McGrann has volunteered previously for the AIDS Support Organization for Uganda (TASO), and has worked as an NIH research assistant on a study of health resources in Kampala. She previously has served as a pediatrician in a Federally Qualified Health Center, providing care for the medically underserved in rural Texas.

Dr. McGrann served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Botswana from January, 2006 through December, 2007. In January, 2008 she accepted a position as a general pediatrician with Bootin & Savrick Pediatric Associates in Houston, Texas.


John K. Midturi, D.O., M.P.H.

Raised in Texas, Dr. Midturi is a graduate of Texas A&M University and the University of North Texas Health Science Center. He trained in both pediatrics and internal medicine at the Scott & White Memorial Hospital at Texas A&M University, where he served as internal medicine chief resident. He completed fellowship training in infectious diseases and a Master of Public Health at the same institution.

Dr. Midturi was born and spent the first six years of his life in India. He has a longstanding interest in international health and has worked previously in Nigeria.

Dr. Midturi served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Malawi from July, 2006 through July, 2008.


Timothy D. Minniear, M.D., M.P.H.

A native of Battle Creek, Michigan, Dr. Minniear is a graduate of Albion College and the Wayne State University School of Medicine. He trained in pediatrics at the University of Tennessee.

Dr. Minniear has been interested in international medicine for many years, but previously had planned to wait until later in his career. He writes, "The Pediatric AIDS Corps has presented an interesting and unique opportunity that will allow me to reorganize my plan to include overseas work at the beginning to a much greater extent. I think it will build a foundation which will strengthen me for all my practice and provide me with contacts that would prove beneficial to working in Africa in the future".

Dr. Minniear served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Malawi from August, 2006 through July, 2007. After leaving the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Minniear accepted a position as a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Fellow at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. He also is pursuing a Masters of Science in Epidemiology at the University of Tennessee.

Of his PAC experience, Dr. Minnear writes: "The effect that my participation in the Pediatric AIDS Corps has had on my life and my practice is difficult to describe. The year in Malawi was both trying and amazing, and I'm incredibly glad that I was one of the fortunate people selected to experience it. Since it was my first job after residency, I was as uncertain of myself and what I could do when I began. By the time I finished, I knew that there was an awful lot that I could handle: challenges that only my colleagues from outside the USA really understand. This served me well as a Pediatric Infectious Diseases fellow, as I am much more confident in my practice and decisive in my clinical decision making. I feel I have gained a better understanding of what is important both in life and in the practice of medicine which, among other things, helps me to relate better to the families for which I care and better utilize resources in the hospital. Any description of what I gained from my time with the PAC cannot leave out the very good friends I made; it was a powerful bonding experience. Also, I must admit that I miss the sunny skies and friendly smiles of Malawi, and while not discounting the impact of practicing in the USA, my work in Malawi brought with it a sense of significance that I have not yet experienced anywhere else and which carries me through to this day."


B. Ryan Phelps, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Phelps is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin and the Duke University School of Medicine. He trained in pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco. He holds a degree in public health from the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Phelps has worked previously in Mexico, Brazil, Honduras, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique, and South Africa. He is fluent in Portuguese and Spanish. Dr. Phelps served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from August, 2006 through January, 2008, when he left the PAC to accept a position as the Associate Director of the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence. He left that role in October, 2009 to accept a position as Senior Pediatric Care/PMTCT Advisor for USAID, in the Office of HIV/AIDS. In this role, he provides technical assistance to USAID-funded programs, primarily in Africa and Latin America. Dr. Phelps also serves on the intra-agency Technical Working Group for PMTCT and Pediatric HIV.


Eric H. Raabe, M.D., Ph.D.

A native of New Orleans, Louisiana, Dr. Raabe attended Brown University and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He also was awarded a PhD in molecular and developmental biology from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Raabe trained in pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha, the national medical honor society, in 2002.

He served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from August, 2006 through April, 2007. After leaving the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Raabe accepted a position as a post doctoral fellow in pediatric hematology/oncology at Johns Hopkins University. Of his PAC experience, Dr. Raabe writes: "While there were many frustrations in working in Swaziland, I think overall it was the most useful I have ever been to anyone, in my life. I would highly recommend it to those interested in using their heart and head and hands to help make the lives of some of the worst-off people in the world a little better. How has working overseas changed me? It has made me more likely to try to develop collaborations overseas, and more interested in developing research projects that will be relevant to the world's poor and underserved. Working with UNICEF and other global international health organizations gave me a better sense of the scope of the problem of HIV and TB in Southern Africa, and a better understanding of how the explosion of problems (such as XDR TB) there relates to our security in the United States."


Thresia Sebastian, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Sebastian is a graduate of the University of California, San Diego, and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at Children's National Medical Center in Washington DC, and holds a Masters in Public Health from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.

Dr. Sebastian has previously worked with HIV/AIDS patients in Guatemala, where she collected and reported opportunistic infection morbidity and mortality data. She also has worked in Sri Lanka, where she investigated maternal and child health of an internally displaced population in two rural districts. She is fluent in Spanish and the South Indian language of Malayalam.

Dr. Sebastian served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from July, 2006 through October, 2007, and as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician "on loan" to the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation in Mozambique thereafter.


Laura Sauve, M.D., M.P.H., D.T.M. & H.

A dual citizen of the United States and Canada, Dr. Sauve is a graduate of the University of Victoria's School of Health Information Science and the University of Calgary School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at the University of Calgary, and completed a fellowship in pediatric infectious diseases at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. She has a Masters in Public Health from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.

Dr. Sauve earned a diploma in tropical medicine from the Gorgas Hospital in Lima, Peru. She has worked previously in New Caledonia, Wallis & Futuna and Uganda. She speaks French and Spanish.

Dr. Sauve served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Burkina Faso from August, 2006 through July, 2007. After leaving the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Dr. Sauve accepted a position as an Assistant Clinical Professor, Division of Infectious & Immunological Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia. Her major research project is a collaboration with University of Cape Town, Stellenbosch University, and University of British Columbia examining the multifactorial determinants of childhood infectious disease in South Africa; specifically lung health (TB, acute respiratory infection, wheezing illness).


Amy Sims, M.D.

Dr. Sims is a graduate of Brown University and the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at the Children's National Medical Center in Washington DC.

Dr. Sims has worked previously in Kenya, Uganda, and Trinidad and Tobago. She is the founder of the Awamu Children's Fund, which is a partnership between pediatric residents at Mulago Hospital in Uganda and Children's Hospital in Washington DC. In January, 2006, Dr. Sims was awarded the AAP Resident International Health Award for work in Uganda.

Dr. Sims served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Malawi from July, 2008 through June, 2008. In July, 2008 she began a fellowship in pediatric cardiology at Children's National Medical Center in Washington DC.


Nandita S. Sugandhi, M.D.

Dr. Sugandhi is a graduate of Columbia University and the University of Michigan Medical School. She trained in pediatrics at New York University. Dr. Sugandhi has worked previously for three years as a rape crisis counselor. During this time she was trained and supervised by clinical psychologists on counseling survivors of domestic violence and sexual abuse.

Dr. Sugandhi served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland for one year before transferring to Botswana for 15 months. Dr. Sugandhi served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland for one year before transferring to Botswana for 15 months. In October, 2008, she transferred to the new assist in the scale-up of the new BIPAI facility in Mbeya, Tanzania. In June, 2009 Dr. Sugandhi took on a new role as technical consultant on a BIPAI evaluation project with UNICEF in India.


Lineo K. Thahane, M.D.

Born in Washington, D.C., Dr. Thahane is a graduate of Princeton University and the Washington University School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Dr.Thahane's parents were born and raised in Lesotho. Her mother, Dr. Edith Mohapi, is also a pediatrician who worked for about twenty years at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Dr. Mohapi recently accepted a new role as director of the Baylor College of Medicine-Bristol Myers Squibb Children's Clinical Center of Excellence in Maseru, Lesotho.

Dr. Thahane spent summers as a child in Lesotho, and is fluent in the local language (Sesotho). Dr. Thahane spent summers as a child in Lesotho, and is fluent in the local language (Sesotho). She currently serves as the Associate Director of the Baylor College of Medicine-Bristol Myers Squibb Children's Clinical Center of Excellence in Maseru, Lesotho.


M. Greg Thompson, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Thompson is a graduate of Iowa State University and the Yale University School of Medicine. He trained in pediatrics at the University of Washington in Seattle.

During residency, Dr. Thompson was a nominee for the AAMC Community Recognition Award for the Boost Kids! Project, which involved curriculum development for booster seat education and distribution among immigrant communities in Seattle. He has worked previously in India, Equatorial Guinea, Taiwan, China and Korea. He speaks Mandarin Chinese, Spanish and Korean.

Dr. Thompson served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Lesotho from August, 2006 through June, 2007. Since November, 2007 he has worked as a General pediatrician in private practice with Peace Health Medical Group in Bellingham, Washington.


Tamara Todd, M.D.

A native of Louisiana, Dr. Todd earned undergraduate and medical degrees from the Louisiana State University. She trained in pediatrics at the Maine Medical Center in Portland.

Dr. Todd lived in Jakarta, Indonesia during her high school years, an experience which sparked her interest in international work. She also has worked in Mexico and Belize, and has worked extensively during her residency with recently resettled immigrants and refugees in Portland, Maine.

Dr. Todd served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Botswana from August, 2006 to June 2007, and then in Swaziland from July, 2007 through July, 2008. She currently works as a general pediatrician with the Hilo Medical Center/Hawaii Health Systems Corporation.


Dwight E. Yin, M.D.

A native of Clear Lake, Texas, Dr. Yin is a graduate of Duke University and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas. He trained in pediatrics at St. Louis Children's Hospital at Washington University in St. Louis.

During medical school, Dr. Yin made two trips to Zimbabwe. On these medical mission trips, he had the opportunity to witness the effects of heavy rain followed by droughts, political corruption and farm seizures on nutrition and other aspects of health. These experiences motivated him to seek a career in international medicine. He speaks Mandarin Chinese, French and Spanish.

Dr. Yin served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Botswana from July, 2006 through July, 2009.


Brian C. Zanoni, M.D.

A native of Trenton, New Jersey, Dr. Zanoni is a graduate of St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia, and Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington DC. He trained in both internal medicine and pediatrics at the Baylor College of Medicine. He was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha, the national medical honor society, in 2001.

Dr. Zanoni has worked previously with Unity Care for the Homeless in Washington DC. He also has international experience working at the Hospital Infantil Rio Hondo, Zacapa, Guatemala. He served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Botswana through July, 2007, then moved to KwaZulu Natal, South Africa, where he served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician "on loan" to support a Harvard Medical School project. In October 2008, Dr. Zanoni left BIPAI to work with Harvard directly in South Africa.


Gretchen Zima, M.D.

Dr. Zima is a graduate of Boston College and the Ross University School of Medicine in Dominica, West Indies. She trained in both internal medicine and pediatrics at Penn State University. She has completed fellowship in pediatric infectious disease and immunology at the University of Miami. She also has a diploma in tropical medicine from the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

Dr. Zima's Bachelor of Science degree is in nursing. She worked for three years as a Bone Marrow Transplant Nurse before enrolling in medical school. Dr. Zima has worked previously in Kenya, Cambodia, Swaziland, Uganda, Belize, Zaire, and Haiti.

Dr. Zima served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Swaziland from August, 2006 through April, 2007.


Jeffrey Zsohar, M.D.

A native of Dallas, Texas, Dr. Zsohar is a graduate of Texas Tech University and the University of Texas at Houston School of Medicine. He trained in both pediatrics and internal medicine at the University of Tennessee.

During medical school, Dr. Zsohar spent two months working in a government supported public health clinic in Guguletu, South Africa, which is an impoverished shanty town outside of Cape Town.

Dr. Zsohar served as a Pediatric AIDS Corps physician in Botswana from July, 2006 through December, 2008. In January, 2009 he began work for Christ Community Health Services in Memphis, Tennessee